Confirmed Measles Case in York County: Frequently Asked Questions | WellSpan Health
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Confirmed Measles Case in York County: Frequently Asked Questions

August 31, 2019

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We realize that the recent confirmed case of measles in York County may lead to some questions as far as how the disease is transmitted, what the symptoms are, and what you can do to prevent the spread.
 
Q: If I was in WellSpan York Hospital or WellSpan Stony Brook Medical Center recently, am I at risk for being infected?
A: WellSpan is currently in the process of making personal contact with all patients who may have been at risk for exposure to the disease. Only those patients who were inside the following WellSpan facilities at the following times are at risk of exposure:
 
  • WellSpan Stony Brook Health Center, 4222 E. Market St., Lincoln Hwy. York, Pa., on Aug. 26 from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
  • WellSpan York Hospital, 1001 S. George St., York, Pa., on Aug. 26:
    • in the proximity of the Lab from 1:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.
    • in the proximity of the Imaging Department from 1:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
    • in the proximity of the Emergency Department from 6:15 p.m. to 1:45 a.m. Aug. 27
    • in the proximity of the Imaging Department from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
  • WellSpan Stony Brook Health Center, 4222 E. Market St., Lincoln Hwy. York, Pa., on Aug. 28 from 10:45 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • WellSpan Stony Brook Health Center, 4222 E. Market St., Lincoln Hwy. York, Pa., on Aug. 29 from 9:50 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
  • WellSpan York Hospital, 1001 S. George St., York, Pa., on Aug. 29 in the proximity of the Emergency Department from 11:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.
Q:  Were there any additional exposures in this community from this patient?
A. The Pennsylvania Department of Health is also alerting the public that there may have been exposure to the measles at the following locations on Aug. 22 and 23:
  • Fuddruckers, 2300 E Market St., York, PA, on Aug. 22 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
  • Hershey Theater, 15 E Caracas Ave., Hershey, PA, on Aug. 23 from 7:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.
If you have questions about exposures during these times at these locations you may call the Pa Department of Health at 1-877-PA-HEALTH.
 
Q:  If I think I am at risk of exposure, what should I do?
If you were at, or near, any of the locations listed above during the above time periods, you can call our WellSpan Measles Exposure toll-free hotline at 1-855-851-3641 to speak with one of our Registered Nurses. They can provide you with guidance on the most appropriate location to receive care. The hotline is currently staffed seven days a week. Individuals who were born before 1957 or who have completed the Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccination series should be safe from exposure.
 
Q: How do I know these facilities are now safe?
A: Because measles is transmitted by air, the infection risk vanishes two hours after a patient leaves a building. There is no current risk of infection at any of these locations.
  
Q: How is measles transmitted?
A: The measles is highly contagious for those not vaccinated and can be transmitted through either direct contact, or when the infected person breathes, coughs, or sneezes near others.
 
Q: What are the symptoms of measles?
A: Symptoms include fever, rash, cough, runny nose, inflamed eyes, or tiny white spots inside the mouth. If you are experiencing these symptoms, please contact your healthcare provider.
 
Q: How long does it take to start experiencing symptoms?
A: Measles is a highly contagious but vaccine-preventable disease that spreads through coughing, sneezing or other contact with the mucus or saliva of an infected person. Symptoms typically appear 1 to 3 weeks after exposure and include: rash; high fever; cough; and red, watery eyes.
 
Q: How much time must pass before I know if I am not infected?
A: If you have not experienced any symptoms in 21 days since exposure to measles, you are likely not infected.
 
Q:  Who is most at-risk for Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)?
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) those most at-risk are:
  • Infants less than one year of age who are too young to have received the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine;
  • Individuals who refused vaccination; and
  • Individuals from parts of the world where there is low vaccination coverage or circulating measles.
Additionally, even if you were vaccinated, you may still be at risk if you were vaccinated with an inactivated vaccine, which was used from 1963 through 1967, and have not been revaccinated; or you were born after 1957 and have only received one dose of MMR vaccine.
 
Q: Is anyone in my family at risk?
A: The most effective way of preventing measles is vaccination. If you or your family have not been immunized for Measles with the MMR vaccine, please contact your primary care provider to discuss getting you and your loved ones vaccinated.
 
Q: If I want to get a Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccine, where can I go?
A: You should contact your primary care physician or visit a WellSpan Urgent Care center. The urgent care locations are open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week.  For a list of locations visit WellSpan.org/UrgentCare.