COPD Action Plan

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Topic Overview

It's important that you know how to treat your COPD. This is true for everyday care and for when your symptoms get worse.

It's also very important that your family, friends, and caregivers know what to do. If you can't care for yourself in an emergency, others need to know how they can help you.

  • Fill out this action plan with your doctor, and keep a copy where others can find it. Tape it to your fridge or post it in some other easy-to-see spot.
  • If you use a metered-dose inhaler, keep these instructions handy so someone else will know how to use it if you need help.
  • Know when to call your doctor.

Your COPD action plan

My name:


Address:


Phone:

Date plan was written:


Emergency contact information

My doctor's or clinic's name:


Address:


Phone:


Name of person to call in an emergency:


Phone:


How to manage your symptoms

If I have these symptoms: I need this medicine (type and name): I take this much, up to this maximum dose:
  • Symptom:

  • Type:
  • Name:
  • Normal dose:
  • Max. dose:
  • Symptom:

  • Type:
  • Name:
  • Normal dose:
  • Max. dose:
  • Symptom:

  • Type:
  • Name:
  • Normal dose:
  • Max. dose:
  • Symptom:

  • Type:
  • Name:
  • Normal dose:
  • Max. dose:
  • Symptom:

  • Type:
  • Name:
  • Normal dose:
  • Max. dose:
  • Symptom:

  • Type:
  • Name:
  • Normal dose:
  • Max. dose:

When to call your doctor

COPD can cause serious problems with breathing, so it's important to know when to get help. Quick treatment may help keep you out of the hospital.

Call 911 anytime you think you may need emergency care. For example, call if:

  • You have severe trouble breathing.

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:

  • You have new or worse trouble breathing.
  • Your coughing or wheezing gets worse.
  • You cough up dark brown or bloody mucus (sputum).
  • You have a new or higher fever.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if:

  • You notice more mucus or a change in the color of your mucus.
  • You need to use your antibiotic or steroid pills.
  • You do not get better as expected.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerMartin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerHasmeena Kathuria, MD - Pulmonology, Critical Care Medicine, Sleep Medicine

Current as ofMarch 25, 2017